Resting state fMRI

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    • Published: 04-25-2014 08:58 am
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resting_state_fMRI

      "Resting state fMRI (rsfMRI or R-fMRI) is a method of functional brain imaging that can be used to evaluate regional interactions that occur when a subject is not performing an explicit task.[1] This resting brain activity is observed through changes in blood flow in the brain which creates what is referred to as a Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Signal (BOLD) that can be measured using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Because brain activity is present even in the absence of an externally prompted task, any brain region will have spontaneous fluctuations in BOLD signal. The resting state approach is useful to explore the brain’s functional organization and to examine if it is altered in neurological or psychiatric diseases. Resting-state functional connectivity research has revealed a number of networks which are consistently found in healthy subjects, different stages of consciousness and across species, and represent specific patterns of synchronous activity.[2][3][4]"

      "Default mode network
      The default mode network (DMN) is a network of brain regions that are active when an individual is awake and at rest. The default mode network is an interconnected and anatomically defined brain system that preferentially activates when individuals focus on internal tasks such as daydreaming, envisioning the future, retrieving memories, and gauging others' perspectives.[16] It is negatively correlated with brain systems that focus on external visual signals. It is one of the most studied networks present during resting state and is one of the most easily visualized networks.[17]

      Other resting state networks
      Depending on the method of resting state analysis, functional connectivity studies have reported a number of neural networks that result to be strongly functionally connected during rest. The key networks, also referred as components, which are more frequently reported include: the DMN, the sensory/motor component, the executive control component, up to three different visual components, two lateralized frontal/parietal components, the auditory component and the temporal/parietal component.[18] As already reported, these resting-state networks consist of anatomically separated, but functionally connected regions displaying a high level of correlated BOLD signal activity. These networks are found to be quite consistent across studies, despite differences in the data acquisition and analysis techniques.[18][19] Importantly, most of these resting-state components represent known functional networks, that is, regions that are known to share and support cognitive functions.[3] "
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